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Prague: ARTĚL Style

Expert recommendations and insider tips for first-time visitors and locals alike from ARTĚL’s founder, Karen Feldman, who has lived in Prague since 1994. Click on the links below for detailed reviews – from Feldman’s own unique perspective – of all the best that Prague has to offer...

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Lobkowicz Palace

Published on August 20th, 2015 in Sights

  • Ernestine room (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Concert Hall (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Armory room (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Hunting Rifles, 17–18th century (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Croll room (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • A view of Roudnice Castle from the River Elbe, C.R. Croll (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection)

  • Lobkowicz Café (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Lobkowicz Café (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Palace entrance (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

  • Gift Shop (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)


Located within the Prague Castle complex, the Lobkowicz Palace houses a significant portion of what is one of the most important private collections of historically important art and artifacts in all of Central Europe. The paintings on view here rival those found in the world’s top-tier museums and include Pieter Brueghel the Elder's Haymaking, arguably the single most important painting in the Czech Republic.

 

 

 

Left: Haymaking (1565), by Pieter Brueghel The Elder (photo by Edward Owen, courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace) | Right: Exhibition room (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

 

 

My favorite part of the exhibition, however, is the series of landscape paintings by Carl Robert Croll, which document the Lobkowicz family’s many estates and the stunning Bohemian countryside of the 1840s. The family’s sheet music archive is also quite impressive and features more than 4,000 scores, including original copies of Beethoven’s Fourth and Fifth Symphonies (complete with his own corrections), and a manuscript of Handel’s Messiah that was later revised and re-orchestrated by Mozart in a torrent of briskly inked annotations.

 

 

  

Left: Manuscript of Handel’s Messiah, with annotations by W.A. Mozart (Detail) (photo by Edward Owen, Courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace) | Right: Beethoven Room (photo courtesy of The Lobkowicz Collection, Lobkowicz Palace)

 

 
 
At least as impressive is the palace itself. Built in the mid-16th century and occupied by the family since that time, it was confiscated by the government in the 1940s, when the exiled family relocated to Boston, Massachusetts. The fall of communism in 1989 led to the passing of restitution laws in the early 1990s, which, in turn, led to the Lobkowicz family finally regaining ownership of their many holdings throughout the Czech Republic, including the palace itself in 2002. The museum was opened to the public in April of 2007. The palace features an excellent gift shop, as well as a café that offers breath-taking views of the entire city. So ditch the hordes trampling the cobblestones of Prague castle, sneak beneath the archway of Jiřská 3, and spend some time absorbing Bohemian history in this unique setting. Don’t miss it.


Lobkowicz Palace

Jiřská 3, Prague 1, Hradčany
www.lobkowicz.cz
tel 233 312 925
hours Daily: 10:00–18:00
entrance fee 275 CZK Adults; 200 CZK Children & Seniors; 6 and under Free
metro Malostranská
tram 22 to Pražský hrad

 

 

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